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Sibynophis collaris
Sibynophis
Physical description
DietCarnivorous
Conservational Status
StatusLeast Concern
Scientific classification
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassReptilia
OrderSquamata
SuborderSerpentes
FamilyColubridae
GenusSibynophis
Distribution
Distribution of speciesSouth Asia

The Common Many-tooth Snake (Sibynophis collaris) is a species of snake found in South Asia.

Description/AnatomyEdit

Distribution and HabitatEdit

DietEdit

BehaviorEdit

ReproductionEdit

In captivityEdit

DescriptionEdit

File:Sibynophis collaris head.png

Rostral scales twice as broad as deep, just visible from above; suture between the inter-nasals shorter than that between the prefrontals; frontal longer than its distance from the end of the snout, as long as the parietals or shorter; loreal as long as or a little longer than deep; one preocular; two postoculars, only the upper in contact with the parietal; temporals 1 (or 2) +2; 9 or 10 upper labials, fourth, fifth, and sixth entering the eye; 4 lower labials in contact with the anterior chin-shields, which are as long as the posterior. Scales in 17 rows. Ventrals 159-190; anal divided; subcaudals 102-131. Brown above, vertebral region greyish, usually with a series of small round black spots; head with small black spots or vermiculations above, and two black cross-bands, one across the posterior part of the frontal and supraoculars, the other across the occiput; a large black nuchal spot or cross-band, bordered with yellow posteriorly; a black line from the nostril to the nuchal spot, passing through the eye, bordering the white black-dotted upper lip. Lower parts yellowish, each ventral with an outer black spot or streak, which may be confluent on the posterior part of the body; anterior ventrals with a pair of median dots in addition.[1] Total length 29 inches; tail 9–5.

DistributionEdit

Sub-Himalayan India (Assam, Simla), Nepal, Myanmar (Burma), Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia, West Malaysia, China (SE Tibet and Yunnan), and Taiwan (Type locality:Khasi Hills, India)

NotesEdit

  1. Boulenger, G. A. 1890. Fauna of British India. Reptilia and Batrachia.

ReferencesEdit

  • Gray, J. E. 1853 Descriptions of some undescribed species of reptiles collected by Dr. Joseph Hooker in the Khassia Mountains, East Bengal, and Sikkim Himalaya. Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. (2) 12: 386 - 392

External linksEdit


zh:黑领剑蛇

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