FANDOM


brown water snake
250px
Conservational Status
StatusLC
Scientific classification
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
OrderSquamata
SuborderSerpentes
FamilyColubridae
GenusNerodia
SpeciesN. taxispilota

The brown water snake (Nerodia taxispilota) is a large species of Natricine snake found in the southeast United States.

Lycodonomorphus rufulus is sometimes also called the brown water snake, but L. rufulus is found in South Africa.

Common NamesEdit

Brown water snake, water-pilot,[1] aspic, false moccasin, great water snake, pied water snake, southern water snake, water rattle, water rattler.[2]

Geographic RangeEdit

Found in lower coastal regions from southeastern Virginia, through the Carolinas and Georgia, to Northern and western Florida (Gulf Coast), then west through Alabama and Mississippi, to Louisiana, normally from sea level to 500 ft. (150 m) elevation.[3]

DescriptionEdit

The brown water snake is very heavy-bodied, and its neck is distinctly narrower than its head. Dorsally it is brown or rusty brown with a row of about 25 black or dark brown square blotches down its back. Smaller similar blotches alternate on the sides. Ventrally it is yellow heavily marked with black or dark brown.[4] Dorsal scales are in 27-33 rows (more than any other North American water snake), and it has 2-4 anterior temporals (usually 1 in others).[5] Adults measure 30-60 in. (76–152 cm) in total length; record 69 in. (175 cm).[6]

HabitatEdit

It is found in swamps and streams and is often mistaken for a venomous snake.

ReproductionEdit

Natrix taxispilota is ovoviviparous. Mating takes place in the spring on land or on tree branches. On average adult females are larger than adult males. The young are born alive, usually in August, in broods of 14-58, more commonly 30-40. The newborns are 7-10¾ in. (18–27 cm) long, with males longer than females, opposite of adults.[7]

Source Edit

Holbrook, J.E. 1842. North American Herpetology; or, a Description of the Reptiles Inhabiting the United States, Vol. IV. Dobson. Philadelphia. Plate VIII & pp. 35–36.

  1. Stejneger, L. and Barbour, T. 1917. A Check List of North American Amphibians and Reptiles.Harvard University Press. Cambridge.
  2. Wright, A.H. and A.A. Wright. 1957. Handbook of Snakes of the United States and Canada. Comstock. Ithaca and London.
  3. Wright, A.H. and A.A. Wright. 1957. Handbook of Snakes of the United States and Canada. Comstock. Ithaca and London.
  4. Schmidt, K.P. and D.D. Davis. 1941. Field Book of Snakes of the United States and Canada. G.P. Putnam's Sons. New York.
  5. Smith, H.M. and E.D. Brodie, Jr. 1982. A Guide to Field Identification Reptiles of North America. Golden Press. New York.
  6. Conant, Roger. 1975. A Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. Houghton Mifflin. Boston.
  7. Wright, A.H. and A.A. Wright. 1957. Handbook of Snakes of the United States and Canada. Comstock. Ithaca and London.

Featured Herp: Brown Water Snake (Nerodia taxispilota)de:Braune Schwimmnatter

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.